Camote Enmielado (Sweet Potato in Syrup)

Family recipes are the best, they are full of nice stories and love. Today’s recipe has been in my mum’s family for generations, my abuela (grandma) Emilia used to make this lovely dessert for my mum and her siblings, so my mum makes it for us and we spent the whole morning talking about my mamá Mila (grandma Emilia) and her delicious desserts.You will love this recipe with sweet potato, it is easy, quick and delicious and it is another way to use sweet potato as a dessert, in fact, in Mexico we used sweet potato in sweet dishes most of the time. I remember when I came to live in London and my hubby ordered sweet potato fries, I was a bit shocked, but I have learnt to like these delicious orange beauties in savoury dishes.

If you decide to make my recipe, let me know if you like it! I would love to know your thoughts!

Serves 4

Ingredients 

  • 5 sweet potatoes peeled and cut in thick round slices
  • 3 cloves
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 250 gr piloncillo (jaggery) or dark brown muscovado sugar
  • 1 cup of water

Method

  1. Peel the sweet potatoes and cut them in thick round slices.

  2. Then put the sweet potato together with the spices and the cup of water in a casserole dish (dutch oven), bring it to a boil and turn the heat down to minimum.

  3. Let them simmer in low heat until the jaggery dissolves and the syrup looks dark and the sweet potato is soft. If you stir, do it gently to prevent the pieces to break.

  4. Serve with milk or vanilla ice cream or have it for breakfast with some yogurt or cottage cheese!

Listo!

Provecho!

Palanquetas de Cacahuate y Pepitorias (Peanut and Pumpkin Seed Pralines)

  

I absolulety love tradional Mexican sweets, they are so delicious, full of nice and healthy things like these mouthwatering palanquetas (pralines). There are many different types of  “palanquetas” in Mexico, but all are made with either seeds, nuts or dried fruit. I’m making mine with just peanuts and pumpkin seeds to give as Christmas presents to my friends.

Makes around 10 little squares of each 

Cook 10 min

Ingredients

  • 2 cups caster sugar
  • 50 gr peeled and toasted peanuts
  • 50 gr pumpkin seeds

Utensils

  • 2 medium saucepans
  • 2 plastic cooking spoons
  • 1 small tray 

Method

  1. First toast the peanuts. Heat a frying pan, once hot place the peanuts on the pan and stir from time to time to avoid burning. Toast them for around 7 min and keep aside on a bowl.
  2. Place one of the saucepans on medium heat and put one cup of caster sugar and let the sugar dissolved. 
  3. Once the sugar is dissolved and has become caramel, add the 50 gr peanuts. Mix very well until all the peanuts are coated with the caramel.
  4. Transfer them onto the tray and flat them. 
  5. Once cool, cut them into squares.
  6. Repeat the same procedure but with a clean saucepan to make the pumpkin seeds praline.

Tips

  • I tent not to stir the sugar when it is melting. I just let the heat to do its job, but keep an eye on the caramel as it can burn very easily and if it burns then it tastes very bitter, so I recommend you to keep the heat medium low.
  • They are delicious and you can wrap them as little Christmas present for friends and family.

Listo!

Provecho!

    
    
   

Alegrías de Amaranto (Amaranth Bar Alegrías)

 

Every year around mid February, Ensenada hosst a traditional port carnival, this is what port cities do. My parents always used to take us to see the parade in the afternoon and that was my favourite part as they used to get us lots of nice sweet treats, one of them were “Alegrias”, these cosy amaranth bars taste just heavenly. This recipe originated in the state of Morelos, Mexico, there they do these amazing shapes and combinations, but nowadays alegrias are very popular all around Mexico.

Alegrias are also extremely nutritious, amaranth are the tiny little seed use to make these mexican sweets, amaranth is similar to quinoa and in fact it is as nutritions as quinoa, as it contains high levels of protein. In Mexico amaranth has been consumed since pre-Colombian times, the Mayans and the Aztecs used to eat a lot of this grains as part of their diet and it was consider a very important ingredient.

The recipe is an easy to make, you just have to be careful while you are popping the amaranth, because it burns very easily.

Makes a 30 d x 20 h tray

Prep 15 min

Cook 15 min

Ingredients 

  • 100 gr amaranth seed
  • 3 light brown small piloncillo bars
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1 oiled 30 x 20 tray

Method

  1. First pop up the amaranth seeds. Heat a pan with a glass lid, try first with a few seeds to see if the pan has the right temperature. Remember the seeds burn quite easily, that is why I suggest to use a glass lid, so you can see when the seeds stop popping. Do it in small batches, I did one tablespoon at a time. Put the popped amaranth in a separate bowl and reserve.
  2. Break all the piloncillo bars and place them in the same pan where you popped the amaranth, add the honey and water and heat until everything has dissolved.
  3. Let the syrup to cool down for 5 min.
  4. Add the popped amaranth into the syrup and stir vigorously until all the seeds are cover with the syrup.
  5. Place the amaranth on a pre-oil tray, I just rubbed a tiny bit of rapeseed oil to avoid the amaranth bars to stick to the tray.
  6. Press the amaranth with a rolling pin and let it cool for a few hours.
  7. Cut them with a sharp knife in different shapes.

Tips

  • You can add pumpkin seeds, almonds, raisins or any other nuts you like.

Listo!

Provecho!